EXTRACTS OF REVIEWS FROM THE BACK COVER OF ETHICS AN OVERVIEW



"What makes Ethics: An Overview accessible is its clear style, based on its author's long teaching experience, with technical terms explained as they arise. Every chapter is divided into a sequence of related topics, each accompanied by its own study questions, reading lists and references. A related website carries notes, background essays and a series of PowerPoint presentations, which could be useful for lecturers, tutors and student study-groups. The beginner is spared some of the grind of annotation, and so has more time for reflection, discussion and working out a personal response ... Every student and teacher of philosophy should consider buying this book." 

JOHN NIGHTINGALE, The Philosophical Quarterly



"Attfield’s Ethics sets a high bar for introductory ethics students, providing detailed, nuanced treatments of its topics. In choosing those topics, Attfield was very clearly playing to his own strengths (nowhere is this more clear than in the refreshingly sophisticated chapter on applied ethics), but those strengths are wide-ranging enough that the book never feels like an excuse to explore the author’s pet projects ... The text as a whole remains highly useful for its purpose." 

CLAIRE BROWN PETERSON, Asbury University, Journal of Moral Philosophy



"An uncommonly clear, fair-minded and up-to-date survey of this vast and contentious field. Attfield is particularly good about Evolution.” 

MARY MIDGLEY, author of "Beast and Man: the Roots of Human Nature



“This is an admirable up-to-date introduction to the main fields of ethics, including meta- ethics and applied ethics. The way Attfield presents his material reveals long-standing teaching experience and makes the book especially suitable for beginners. Though taking a firm stance on the more controversial topics of ethics (rather than indulging in mere "option presentation") Attfield consistently avoids being magisterial. Instead, the reader is invited to think things through for himself and to come to his own conclusions.”
DIETER BIRNBACHER, Professor of Philosophy, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Germany